first_imgBuy a boat horn. When prompted to press 1 to speak to an operator, go ahead and give them a blast.Fred AmesMalta Categories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionFed up with getting annoying robo callsStop the annoying robo calls. I don’t need your student loan fixed. Social Security doesn’t contact you by phone. Credit cards don’t need fixing. I’m wondering how many politicians have stock in the companies that make plastic bags.I know they can be a pain, but I use the grocery store ones to line my wastepaper baskets. I have one in every room and one at the end of my countertop to collect stuff in. Without those bags, I’d have to buy some. So is that what they want? Do they want to force us poor people who make good use of the grocery bags to have to spend money to buy them?When I buy items that don’t really need a bag, I tell the cashiers not to put them in a bag. So the ones that I do get, I make very good use of.I know that the stores put the price of the bags onto the items in the store. So are they going to lower prices because now they don’t have to use bags? I seriously doubt it.It’s not healthy to use cloth bags, especially if you buy meat products. They always put them in a separate bag and I just cannot imagine having to put the groceries together because somebody decided that they can make money from their stock as they force us to buy bags now.With all the problems we have that need fixing, I cannot see why they are concentrating on such a small thing. I recycle and try to do my best to protect the environment. But I do believe this is going too far.Wanda E. HunterSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motorists State’s new plastic bag ban goes too farcenter_img Beavers are a help to the environmentA nature preserve where people do not enjoy seeing wildlife is a rare place indeed, according to the April 8 Daily Gazette story. And there’s a growing awareness of beavers as “eco-heroes” that combat our worst environmental problems — for free. Why did none of this matter in the recent effort to remove beavers from the Woodlawn Preserve? A heartbroken Schenectady couple called our nonprofit and said they’d been visiting beavers at the “Preserve” regularly for years.Imagine their shock at finding that family’s dam breached and ringed with six large conibear traps.These powerful traps often kill pet dogs and rare species, too.  Children have been hurt, and one set for beavers even broke a man’s leg.Where there is vacant habitat, beavers will return. Instead of trapping, using a leveler in a dam to manage the water level gives a lasting, win-win solution.Even if a professional installer is hired, the savings versus the short-term solution of killing is impressive. When the Virginia Department of Transportation had beaver devices installed, for each dollar spent, taxpayers saved $8.37. A U.S. Fish and Wildlife program, Partners for Wildlife, may provide free materials for a leveler.Beaver dams restore wetlands that almost half our rare species require. Dams both cleanse and help stabilize streams. That reduces the costly damage from floods and droughts that are worsening with climate change. More people are now partnering with beavers, especially in the West.There will be a free screening of the Beaver Believers documentary today (April 18) at 6:30 p.m. at the Little Falls Public Library. All are welcome. Sharon T. BrownDolgevilleThe writer is a wildlife biologist.last_img read more

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first_imgLinkedin BPIP Yudian-Wahyudi Jokowi-second-term UIN-Sunan-Kalijaga extremism radicalism radicalism-in-indonesia Pancasila Topics : Log in with your social account Facebook President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo has appointed the rector of Sunan Kalijaga Islamic State University, Yudian Wahyudi, as the head of the the Agency for Pancasila Ideology Education (BPIP), which is expected to promote  the values of Pancasila – Indonesia’s state ideology – particularly with the younger generation.He succeeded Yudi Latif, who stepped down in June 2018. BPIP vice chairman Hariyono held the position as acting chairman for 20 months before Yudian’s appointment.Yudian attended a pesantren (Islamic boarding school) in Java and completed his undergraduate and graduate studies at Sunan Kalijaga University before obtaining his PhD at McGill University in Canada. As an Islamic scholar, he is known for progressive thinking that has challenged other intellectuals such as Nurcholis Madjid and Azyumardi Azra.Ujang Komarudin, the … LOG INDon’t have an account? Register here Forgot Password ? Googlelast_img read more

first_imgAccording to Article 16 of Chapter III in the omnibus law, which is about improving investment ecosystems and business activities, businesses can submit a request for the use of space with the central government if the local administration does not have a detailed spatial plan (RDTR).However, Herman said that from the 514 regencies and cities in the country, only 53 had an RDTR. This means that the central government will handle the approval of Amdal documents for more than 400 regencies and cities.“The central government will also decide the risk level of businesses, although it is actually the local governments that understand the risk and impact of business activities in their areas.”The bill will also revise Law No. 26/2007 on spatial planning, allowing the central government to issue a presidential decree when there is an overlap in the use of land, forest areas or permits.The bill will also amend Article 23 of Law No. 32/2009 on environmental protection. The omnibus bill states that only businesses that have “a major impact on the environment, social, economic and culture” will require an Amdal.Further criteria regarding what constitutes a “major impact” will be determined by a government regulation (PP).Environmental impact assessments will also be conducted by the central government and it can delegate certified institutions or experts to carry out the job, replacing the role of Amdal assessment committees, which comprise the environment agency, related technical institutions, environment and technical experts, environmental organizations and public representatives.“We are not sure that Indonesia has enough certified Amdal assessment institutions,” Herman said.Meanwhile, KPPOD executive director Robert Endi Jaweng said the omnibus bill on job creation would reduce regional governments’ power to manage their own regions.Furthermore, he said, the central government usually did not understand the situation that occurred in the regions.“What is left for the regional government to do?” he asked during the seminar. “With Indonesia’s vast territory, it will be difficult if all matters related to licensing are taken over by the central government.”He expressed doubts that the central government had the capacity to handle all the tasks stated in the bill.Robert suggested that during the bill’s deliberation in the House of Representatives, legislators should make changes that would distribute the responsibilities between the central and regional governments to ensure decentralization.“I think there is no need for a target on when this bill should be passed if it means sacrificing the quality of the regulations,” he said, adding that he predicts the bill would be passed later this year.The omnibus bill on job creation will amend 73 laws and consist of 15 chapters and 174 articles. Businesspeople have long complained about Indonesia’s overregulated business environment, which involves 43,511 central government regulations. Eisya A. EloksariThe Jakarta Post/JakartaThe omnibus bill on job creation will weaken regional administrations by taking away their authority over the use of space and environmental impact analyses (Amdal) and putting in solely in the hands of the central government. According to Jakarta-based think tank Regional Autonomy Watch (KPPOD), instead of improving the process for starting a business, the bill will confuse prospective entrepreneurs.“These new regulations obscure the role of local governments,” KPPOD researcher Herman Suparman said during a seminar on the omnibus law as seen through the perspective of regional administrations on Feb. 20.“At present, potential business owners go to the regional government to approve their Amdal. Later, it would have to coordinate everything with the central government.”He added that this would only complicate bureaucracy and lengthen the process of creating a business.center_img Topics :last_img read more